Journalists and social networking sites woes

30 09 2009
Credit: Duane Hoffman / msnbc.com

Credit: Duane Hoffmann / msnbc.com

The Washington Post has one. The Wall Street Journal does too. So does The New York Times.

Ten years ago, many never would have imagined having to create a staff policy guide on social media etiquette. But here we are.
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Media convergence under five minutes

24 09 2009

A nicely made flash animation that illustrates what media convergence and how today’s digital technology effects just about everyone.





Tools currently advancing Journalism 2.0

1 09 2009

As mentioned before, I’m all about technology that saves times and energy. Tools that are seamless and work for you instead of against you are a major plus especially in the world of multimedia journalism and new media. Media convergence is changing.

So here are tools being developed or  are already out there that can help journalists today:

1. Google Voice. Once again, Google creates a new powerful application (though access to Voice currently is by invitation only). What I love most about this app is how customizable Google has made it to users. Here’s an excellent article from Poynter Online explaining its capabilities and  how journalists can improve by using Google Voice.

2. WebCom. It’s a new commenting system that doesn’t follow the traditional comment by chronological order that virtually all comment-enabled sites use. Washingtonpost.com developed this Flash-based system and allows for a more visual, popular-based form of interaction. Click here to read more about it.

3. Zemanta. Many journalists today run their own blog and Web site. Zemanta is a free internet browser based aggregation service geared specifically towards blogging (try the demo). Zemanta cruises the Web and looks for any relevant links, images and related articles (while respecting copyright laws) and brings them to you. You can use Zemanta in other ways like when you use email or Facebook.

–UPDATE–

Google’s vision of the future of journalism

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